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Boy meets girl, they walk through a magic door: Book Review of “Exit West”

In Book and Theme Posts, Monthly Book Picks, Narrative by Angelina Eimannsberger

By Angelina Eimannsberger “In a city swollen by refugees but still mostly at peace, or at least not yet openly at war, a young man met a young woman in a classroom and did not speak to her.” (3) This is how Mohsin Hamid’s novel Exit West opens. The main characters Nadia and Saeed live in a country on the …

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October book pick: Exit West

In Book and Theme Posts, Submissions/Outreach by Angelina Eimannsberger

In October, Indulgence will read Exit West by Mohsin Hamid. The novel imagines a country torn apart by Civil War and two lovers who find a surprising way of escape: by walking through a door that takes them to far away places. Read with us. Share your thoughts on this novel and other stories about fleeing, violence, and new futures with us! Submit your pitches …

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Imaginative Metaphor to Bring Home Social Justice: Christina Sharpe, “In the Wake: On Blackness and Being”.

In Book and Theme Posts, Intervention by indulgencezine@gmail.com

“The means and modes of Black subjection may have changed, but the fact and structure of that subjection remain” (12) — Christina Sharpe By Angelina Eimannsberger Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being explores the realities of being black in the diaspora through the metaphor of being “in the wake.” She uses several valences of being ‘in the …

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Literature as Nurture in “The Namesake”

In Book and Theme Posts, Narrative, Women and Novels by indulgence_old

By Angelina Eimannsberger Jhumpa Lahiri’s first novel, The Namesake, might seem like an American immigrant story like we’ve seen before: Bengali parents arrive in Massachusetts, raise their Indian American children there, and all of them struggle with loneliness, belonging, and freedom, if in their own ways. The Namesake, though, is a beautiful and observant novel. It is set apart from other storytelling about the immigrant experience by its insistence …

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The Mothers: Care and Masculinity

In Book and Theme Posts, Feminism, Women and Novels by indulgence_old

by Ian Kennedy The Mothers, in accord with its title, is concerned with motherhood, femininity, and women’s homosocial care. Its author, Brit Bennet, takes on the intricacies of those relationships with grace, carefully constructing both the interaction and interiority of her characters. I expected those themes when I picked up the book, and I enjoyed their masterful development. As a male reader, …

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May: “An Aesthetic Education”

In Book and Theme Posts, Monthly Book Picks by indulgence_old

By Indulgence Editors Our May book pick is Gayatri Spivak’s 2012 monograph “An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization.” Referencing Friedrich Schiller’s “On the Aesthetic Education of Man”, a treatise about Immanuel Kant’s transcendental aesthetics and the events of the French Revolution, Spivak offers a contemporary, postcolonial, feminist treatise on the ethical value and moral impact of education. We read Spivak …

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Massad’s “Islam in Liberalism”: how do we use our words?

In Book and Theme Posts, Monthly Book Picks by indulgence_old

By Angelina Eimannsberger I love academia, never a popular statement in the so-called real world, and often also smiled at by academics themselves. I love finding concepts and explanations that clarify, that sharpen my thinking. I indulge in the possibility to use effective terms and precise descriptions in conversation with others and in my writing to step up my analytical game and make …

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February is for fighting

In Book and Theme Posts by indulgence_old

by Angelina Eimannsberger Our February book pic is Monique Wittig’s Let Guerilleres. We planned it as a fun literary excursion to France–and that’s still what it is–but now it’s also a strategic call to our sisters: How do we fight? What do we do? How do we stand for equality and freedom against a supreme power that seems ready to crush everything? …